heatheretteismypet:

pandarican:

smellthischesspiece:

Found in Brooklyn

Fuck.

yep

heatheretteismypet:

pandarican:

smellthischesspiece:

Found in Brooklyn

Fuck.

yep

Oct 13th • Notes: 10268

sadurday:

Ilana + adoring Abbi

me @ softbutt666

Oct 13th • Tagged: abbi jacobson ilana glazer broad city love • Notes: 15238
7 Things Your Colorblind Racist Friend Might Say to You and How to Respond | Atlanta Black Star

america-wakiewakie:

1) Colorblind

What they say:

“People are just people.”  ”I don’t see color.”  ”We’re all just human.”   “Character, not color, is what counts with me.”

Response:

“Colorblindness” negates the cultural values, norms, expectations and life experiences of people of color. Even if an individual white person can ignore a person’s skin color, society does not.

Claiming to be “colorblind” can also be a defense when someone is afraid to discuss racism, especially if the assumption is that all conversation about race or color is racist.  Color consciousness does not equal racism.

2) Reverse Racism

What they say:

“Blacks cry ‘racism’ for everything, even though they are more or just as racist as white people.”

Response:

Let’s first define racism with this formula: Racism = racial prejudice + systemic institutional power.

To say people of color can be racist, denies the power imbalance inherent in racism. Although some Black people dislike whites and act on that prejudice to insult or hurt them, that’s not the same as systematically oppressing them and negatively affecting every aspect of their lives.

People of color, as a social group, do not possess the societal, institutional power to oppress white people as a group. An individual Black person who is abusing a white person, while clearly wrong, is acting out a personal racial prejudice, not racism.

3) It’s Not Race

What they say:

“It’s not race, it’s economics.”  ”Classism is the new racism.”

Response:

“Being Black and middle class is fundamentally different to being white and middle class.” This is what  Dr. Nicola Rollock, a researcher at The Institute of Education at the University at Birmingham in the U.K., said after researching the issue.

For the report, “The Educational Strategies of the Black Middle Classes,” Rollock and her team looked at African-Caribbean families in particular, and confirmed that there is a Black “middle class”  who work very hard to do the best for their children. But researchers also discovered that social status and relative wealth do not protect Black people from racism.

Racism is a reality in the lives of  Black middle-class families and it extends to the upper class too, as Oprah Winfrey would agree based on her widely reported racial-profiling incident at a Zurich boutique last year.

4) Blame the Victim

What they say:

“Blacks are not willing to work hard.”  ”Blacks feel entitled and want everything handed to them.”  ”Blacks hold themselves back, not racism.”   “We have advertised everywhere, there just aren’t any qualified Blacks for this job.”

Response:

When blame-the-victim tactics are used, it provides an escape from discussing the real problem: racism. Therefore, the agents of racism, white people and their institutions, can avoid acknowledging a system of oppression exists.

As long as the focus remains on Black folks, white people can minimize or dismiss our experiences and never have to deal with their responsibility or collusion in racism and white privilege.

5) Deny, Deny, Deny

What they say:

“Blacks are unfairly favored, whites are not.”

Response:

This form of denial is based on the false notion that the playing field is now level. When some white folks are expected to suddenly share their privilege, access and advantage, they often perceive it as discrimination. White people’s attacks on programs like affirmative action and Black History Month are usually rooted in this false perception.

6) Pull Yourself Up by Your Bootstraps

What they say:

“America is the land of opportunity, built by rugged individuals, where anyone with grit can succeed if they just pull up hard enough on their bootstraps. So Blacks need to pull themselves up from the bottom like everyone else.”

Response:

U.S. social propaganda has convinced many people that an individual’s hard work is the main determinant of success in the country. This ideology totally denies the impact of either oppression or privilege on any person’s chance for success, and pretends that every individual, regardless of color, gender, disability, etc.,  has the same access to the rights, benefits and responsibilities of society.

It also implies that Blacks have only their individual character flaws or cultural inadequacies to blame, and not racism.

7) Racism Is Over

What they say:

“Blacks live in the past. We dealt with racism in the 1960s with all the marches, sit-ins and speeches by Martin Luther King Jr.  Laws have been changed. Segregation and lynching have ended. We have some details to work out, but real racism is pretty much a thing of the past. They need to get over it and move on.”

Response:

The absence of legalized, enforced segregation does not mean the end of racism. This denial of contemporary racism, based on an inaccurate assessment of both history and current society, romanticizes the past and diminishes today’s reality.

If there is no race problem, there would be no school-to-prison pipeline in Mississippi that leads to the arrest and sentencing of Black students for infractions as insignificant as wearing the wrong color socks.

New York City’s Stop and Frisk policy that led to 400,000 police encounters with innocent Black and Latino New Yorkers, would not have happened.

If there is no race problem,  why is a Black person 3.73 times more likely to be arrested for marijuana possession than a white person, even though Blacks and whites use marijuana at similar rates?

(Read Full Text)

BAM. 

Sep 14th • Notes: 20356

A Koala reflecting on his sins, his triumphs, and the inevitability of death.

Aug 26th • Tagged: koala • Notes: 202273
microwave-dinner:

leanin:
What would have once sounded like a “far-fetched feminist fantasy” – women forming the majority of a parliament – is a reality in Rwanda.
In fact, women are making gains throughout Africa, but these achievements have been met with a loud silence from the western feminist movement. 
African women are blazing a feminist trail - why don’t we hear their voices? (The Guardian) 

microwave-dinner:

leanin:

What would have once sounded like a “far-fetched feminist fantasy” – women forming the majority of a parliament – is a reality in Rwanda.

In fact, women are making gains throughout Africa, but these achievements have been met with a loud silence from the western feminist movement. 

African women are blazing a feminist trail - why don’t we hear their voices? (The Guardian) 

Aug 21st • Notes: 53326
slow-floris:

(via microwave-dinner, kio)

slow-floris:

(via microwave-dinner, kio)

Aug 21st • Notes: 728

what touches you is what you touch. what touches you is what you touch. what touches you is what you touch. what touches you is what you touch.
what touches you is what you touch.

Aug 21st • Notes: 0
Aug 21st • Notes: 41
ollie-murphy:

ive been buying old magazines for collages and i found this

ollie-murphy:

ive been buying old magazines for collages and i found this

Aug 21st • Notes: 27520

Beyond Ferguson, the pattern is clear. Blacks are always to blame, even as we are brutalized by police, ghettoized by neoliberal policies, and disenfranchised by a racist criminal (in)justice system.

But that’s the crux of white supremacist racial logic: the problem with black people is … well, black people – not mass incarceration and the deindustrialization of urban America, not educational inequality and generational poverty, not 400 years of slavery, lynchings, and Jim Crow. To be black in America is to be victimized and then made responsible for our victimization. We built this country. But, apparently, it is we who are lazy and dependent. We are bullied politically, socially and economically. But it is we who are called ‘thugs.’

Nyle Fort, "White Supremacy Is the Real Culprit in Ferguson; the Excuses Just Prove It" (via sonofbaldwin) Aug 21st • Notes: 4745

brittanysimon:

micdotcom:

Most people give the homeless change or leftovers, Mark Bustos is cutting their hair

For the past few months, New York City hairstylist Mark Bustos — who normally spends his days working at an upscale salon — has been volunteering on his days off to offer haircuts to homeless people he sees on the street. With a simple phrase, “I want to do something nice for you today,” he has been helping people get a fresh, uplifting makeover.

For people who have been trapped in a cycle of poverty, unemployment and homelessness, the makeover can also serve a useful function: looking presentable for a job.

Inspiring thanks he received from one man | Follow micdotcom

I just began crying. This is beautiful.
Aug 21st • Notes: 58713

lotusinthesun:

mvgl:

The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air 2x09 - “Cased Up” (November 11, 1991)

WOW

:( :( :(

Aug 21st • Notes: 323350
Aug 20th • Notes: 117718

i am so, so in love with my new house and neighborhood and roommates. how the hell did i get so lucky?? finally arrived in pittsburgh around two this morning and snapped the first photo just after sunrise from the window in our staircase. i can’t believe we found such a lovely apartment for such a steal in this neighborhood. seriously so happy right now. i can’t believe i’m finally here to stay.

Aug 17th • Tagged: bloomfield pittsburgh pgh home happiness lyfe • Notes: 5

2ndversesameasthe1st:

misandry-mermaid:

ETA: This is a scene from The House I Live In, a film on the American drug war and its effects on communities of color, education, the class disparity and the prison industrial complex.  I cannot recommend this film highly enough.

It’s on UK Netflix for anyone interested!

Aug 5th • Notes: 59182

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Themed by cummy.